‘Seeing is Believing’ and ‘Believing is Seeing’

by E. Walsh, Australia

If the eyes are the windows to the soul, then why is it that our beliefs have come to shroud, control or influence that which we see? We all know how to manipulate our beliefs to satisfy and fit in with what it is we want to see. I suspect that we have come to do this for two reasons: firstly, to serve as a filter, so that we only see that which we want to find (projection), and secondly, as a veil to avoid seeing that which we don’t want to see or find (a reflection we avoid).

This introduces the philosophical discussion on the relationship between ‘seeing and believing’. 

Simplistically, Plato has been taken to have implied that ‘believing is seeing’, and this view was later reversed by his student Aristotle to ‘seeing is believing’ – the latter view contributes greatly to what has been accepted as the standard measure on which the sciences have based their principle known as the ‘Scientific Method’…. a structured method of arriving at a ‘safe’ conclusion. However, given the claimed unreliability of the first proposition – ‘believing is seeing’ – we find that it is still the more prevalent standard applied to everyday living (seeing), even though it is susceptible to those habits of prejudice and opinions with which we are all blinded, and that ultimately influence our findings.

Lest the so called ‘Scientific Method’ principles of ‘demonstrable, observable, repeatable’, are too vigorously promoted, it is worth mentioning that they too have been shown to be not immune to the influence of the intention underlying the method. Expectations can differ from person to place and results can be shown to still follow bias or belief even in sterile conditions. So there is validity in questioning the process used to establish accepted beliefs in all its derived forms.

But did Plato actually imply ‘believing is seeing’ in its simplistic accepted understanding, or was he offering us a whole lot more? This open ended question leads to another important question and one less discussed in the philosophical or scientific arena (with the exception of Quantum Physics which explores this exact problem): if our beliefs determine our choices and so affect the likely outcome, how can we make a real choice? Or, to put it another way, how do we really know how to choose when those choices are made from existing beliefs, how is any preference differentiated from beliefs, and does this fundamental variable, that is, this cause and effect equation, affect the outcomes of what it is we actually see or find?

It is likely that this question relates to the reason behind the Aristotelian reversal of Plato’s position in the first place. If our beliefs are behind the motivation or preference that then sets up what we see (seek) and then find (or vice versa), then Aristotle was of course justified to reverse the proposition set out by Plato. However, what if there is a knowing that is not influenced by this prejudice? What if there is a posture to hold that chooses to see and is not attached to what it will see or find? And if so, what if this posture is simply a knowing based on feeling and observation? It is a somewhat fraught concept to suggest that we can have beliefs and see what is true, and then accept that this process is not influenced by our habitual beliefs or needs. Therefore, is it possible that Plato, knowing this, actually presented something else, now largely forgotten, when he set out his theory of forms?

If so, what if seeing has little to do with our eyes in the first place! And if this is in fact so, what if seeing is actually a form of understanding the first principle of… ‘what is felt in our bodies’. From this understanding we can then see with clarity, depth and wholeness, and do so without being influenced by our limited ingrained beliefs. If this is so, we can then truly believe in what it is that we can see, through what is first felt. The concept of ‘believing is seeing’ can then be claimed as a belief in the knowing of what is already there; a knowing derived through the inherent felt qualities and not through our thought form projections or resisted reflections.

We cannot drive a car or ride a bicycle through only having read a manual, even though we may choose to believe otherwise. The ability does not happen until we get to the feeling ­– the tangible experience where learning is done through and with our body’s ability to engage in the act of feeling with the learning. The first ones to ever attempt to ride a bicycle would have failed the ‘seeing is believing’ test for quite some time and not before their true knowing posture – believing is seeing – actually took form and became reality.

I think that what Aristotle actually missed out on is this: our true beliefs are reached through our ability to feel and engage with our whole being – a felt knowledge, and from there know that while the principle of ‘believing is seeing’ may take time to then take shape to be seen, it will be a belief based on the quality of the essence of what is felt to be real – a complete knowing understanding that is behind those unshakable beliefs, that take form, even in the face of immense resistance.

I would not have believed that what I now know and feel would have been possible if it was not for the work delivered through Universal Medicine presenting the Ageless Wisdom. I did not know how to move with myself or even use my sight to see or apply my feelings to confirm what it was I could feel (despite the countless eyes that I looked into every day), and as a consequence, I had denied myself the opportunity and the reward of tireless and yet immense contact with the world. A world that is so out of contact with itself, a world which burdened by the principle of ‘seeing is believing’, has denied itself access to a living expression.

The result is an exhausted world. All because of a concept – a simplistic but erroneous reversal of a few words, a philosophy that many, if not most, have been tied to, and through which has ultimately led to a devastating detachment from our essence and a disconnection from our natural ability to feel – that is, we have been existing and not living; moving through life without initiating life. A life abandoned to fatalism and measured by probable outcomes.

Look and you shall see, seek and you shall find – but feel and you will know what to believe.

245 thoughts on “‘Seeing is Believing’ and ‘Believing is Seeing’

  1. Science is a world based on the principle that you have to proceed in a way that allows you to arrive to ‘safe’ conclusions. The ‘scientific method’ works in many respects and help us to get consensus on many aspects of life. That notwithstanding, the scientific method is limited to capture other truths of life. It is a bit like we decide that the universe is only what the Hubble telescope tells us it is. What if we all have an innate instrument (our body) that is able to capture through feeling deeper truths about life than any human construct?

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