How Did Taking Good Advice Start Meaning You’re in a Cult?

by Suzanne Anderssen, Brisbane Australia

Your article titled New age ‘medicine’ of Serge Benhayon leaves trail of broken families is full of holes, innuendos and, to put it bluntly, lies. I totally agree with Dr Rachel Hall in that there are no grounds to call Universal Medicine a cult. People choosing to live a life in harmony with themselves, their partners, families, friends, colleagues and environment should be regarded as something wonderful, celebrated as a way of life.

In one article, we are told by the medical fraternity that caffeine is not good for us. In another we are told alcohol is bad for us. In another, we are told to get more sleep, go to bed at a regular time. Many, many, many people and doctors know gluten is harmful in the body. And many, many others know dairy causes them gastric or allergic issues. So when someone (be they male or female) decides to listen to themselves and to the many medical articles that have been written separately, and decides to follow all of that advice at the same time, then it is considered weird, cult-like behaviour. How weird is that?

The treatments Universal Medicine practitioners offer are nothing short of beautiful, caring procedures. There is no impropriety involved in an esoteric breast massage whatsoever. The creams used have been created by people who treat themselves to an amazing amount of self-love, and thus the end product created is one of integrity and care for its users. Don’t buy it if you don’t agree.

And to the journalists Josh Robertson and Liam Walsh, you should be ashamed of yourselves for insinuating that it is normal for men to touch their partners without their permission. This is not normal behaviour. If I ever lived in a relationship where it was okay to be touched by anyone without giving my permission, I would leave in a second. Being touched without permission is nothing short of assault.

122 thoughts on “How Did Taking Good Advice Start Meaning You’re in a Cult?

  1. Serge Benhayon has been the only person I have met that’s been ultra careful to NOT tell others what to do, in a world where we are bombarded with health and other information constantly.

  2. Suzanne, I could not agree with you more. There are thousand’s (maybe an underestimation) of books worldwide, that are written, that if we eat this or drink this or do this or that, your life will change. If we are really honest with ourselves, many of us would have bought books or attended a workshop or webinar, to help us with something in our lives. I certainly can put my hand up to it, and what happens afterwards? Tried it, didn’t work, ok what’s the next fad? And we blame the thing we tried as being responsible for it not working, or improving anything for us.

    And so the cycle goes on throughout our lives.

    Along comes someone, who asks us to consider say, listening to our bodies, no impositions, just to observe, the choice is within us to take heed or not. As we experiment, people around, notice and, all of a sudden out comes the label gun, and we are fired at. Something is working for you, but we rather it didn’t, because we don’t want to admit that there is truth behind it.

    And so it continues.

    1. That may be why true truth is so absent in this world, its presence exposes so much that it’s shot down by the massive reaction of the masses.

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