Before & After Universal Medicine: From Living a Lie to Living Who I Truly Am

Before UNIVERSAL MEDICINE: Living a Double Life – Living a Lie

When I was little my mum often said that we would be punished if we were naughty but we would be punished double if we were naughty and lied about it. I remember taking this very seriously and feeling that lying was the worst crime of all.

Back then I equated lying with not telling the truth about what I had done wrong and hiding bad behaviour. I soon learned that lying was about so much more than that. In fact I could tell that the adults around me, my parents included, lied all the time. I found this so confusing.

Leonne Sharkey (Age 6)
Me (Age 6) – As a flower girl “still holding that basket!”

When I was about 6 years old I was a flower girl at my aunt and uncle’s wedding. I was so intent on looking the part and not ruining my dress that I held my heavy basket of flowers out and away from myself all throughout the wedding ceremony.

I told myself it didn’t matter how much it hurt, it was my job to keep smiling and do as I was told on this important day.

It’s funny to look back on now, for at the time I would never have equated my stint as a flower girl with being a lie… but it was. My refusal to put the basket down showed that I had already learned to act the way I believed others needed me to in order to be accepted and ‘do the right thing’.

I had learned to ignore how my body felt.

My parents divorced when I was 10 and over time I noticed that I would act one way with my mum and her partner and another completely different way when with my dad. I felt like two different people and I didn’t like either one of them. I completely lost myself.

When I visited my dad I would go to church and act as though butter wouldn’t melt in my mouth. I didn’t want to let him down. At home with my mum I would unleash my anger, with outbursts of screaming and swearing.

Leonne Sharkey (Age 15)
Me (Age 15) – Playing the good daughter

I was living a double life.

I was constantly afraid that people from different areas of my life would meet and realise I was a fraud. Underneath it all was a deep sense of not being good enough and not knowing who I was.

Throughout my 20’s I worked long hours in clothing stores. The chain I worked for sold a picture of health, youth, vitality and happiness and it was my job to look the part.

I ticked the boxes with clear skin, a slim figure, lovely clothes and a big smile, but on the inside I was a mess. It was not uncommon for my co-workers and I to eat several bags of lollies a day and I often had donuts and coffee for breakfast. I took medication daily to control my acne and my cholesterol was so high my doctor asked if I was eating engine oil. I often spent my days off in bed exhausted and feeling totally inadequate: my life was not turning out how I had hoped. I did not like myself and loving myself seemed to be impossible.

Leonne Sharkey (Age 25)
My passport photo (Age 25) – note the hardness in my jaw and the sadness in my eyes

When I was 26 I decided that my life would be better if I went back to university. I enrolled in a Masters degree, determined to leave retail and ‘be successful’. I pushed myself hard, determined to ‘make something of myself’. Halfway through my studies I decided to head off on my first overseas adventure: the passport photo on the left shows exactly how hard and tough I had become as a result of how I was living at this time.

When I returned from my trip I decided not to continue my studies; I could feel that the degree was not going to bring me the success I craved and it felt great to let go of something that wasn’t true for me.

Soon after this I switched careers, my circumstances improved and I no longer felt like a failure.

I played the model employee and worked hard from Monday to Friday. My time off was spent attending parties, music festivals and social events. I fuelled my lifestyle with sugar, caffeine, alcohol, nicotine and worse.

I did my best to address my abusive relationship with myself, spending thousands of dollars seeing counsellors and a psychologist to try and deal with my issues. In the end I understood exactly what I was doing but at the core of it nothing changed.

The truth is my new career path was just another lie and my new job did not truly change the fact I did not love myself. I still felt like I was always at the mercy of my circumstances.

I didn’t want to admit the truth so I presented a picture I thought others would admire.

In my late 20’s my Facebook page was full of photos that showed me surrounded by friends, visiting exotic locations and wearing gorgeous clothes. It sure looked like I was living a full life.

Leonne Sharkey (Late 20's)
Me (late 20’s) with a New York hot dog

Leonne Sharkey (party time)
Party time…

I knew my diet and lifestyle was harmful as I was constantly sick and still on medication to control my acne. I tried cutting out the foods that were having a negative effect but the cravings were unbearable and I always caved in. I absolutely hated the effects my party lifestyle had on my body but I didn’t want to give it up. The parties were the places I had fun, connected with others, let loose and forgot about my problems.

I didn’t advertise the fact that when the excitement of the latest travel adventure or big event was over I often felt depressed, exhausted, lonely and without purpose. I began suffering from chronic and debilitating headaches and it became clear that I needed to change my life.

I turned to a range of modalities, practitioners and self help books and although I could see glimmers of truth in many of these things, I couldn’t seem to change my behaviour in a meaningful way.

I knew I was living a lie but I could feel that everyone else was living one too.

There seemed to be no way out, although deep down I could feel that there was.

Living the way I truly wanted to seemed impossible.

After UNIVERSAL MEDICINE: Living Responsibly – Living Who I Truly Am

Leonne Sharkey (Age 31)
Me (Age 31) – dressed as a superhero

Soon after my 30th birthday I discovered the Universal Medicine clinic in Brisbane, Australia. I instantly knew I had found a place where I could truly heal and change my life. I began seeing an esoteric practitioner for esoteric Chakra-puncture and I began to read Serge Benhayon’s books and attend the presentations offered by Universal Medicine. Absolutely everything I read and experienced rang true for me – for the first time in my life I began to feel that there was a way I could live true to myself.

Serge Benhayon consistently presented that the body tells the truth and this really resonated with me. I began to listen to my own body and honour what it needed. Over time I stopped drinking coffee, eating gluten, dairy and sugar and drinking alcohol. I had more energy and felt more balanced.

I found that I still felt like I was living a double life for a while. I would tell some people I had sworn off alcohol and then go out with others and have a boozy night, telling myself I could get away with it. I would then feel sick and depressed for weeks. It was clear that what Serge was presenting was true for me. My body was telling me that alcohol was a very bad idea.

I now know that the most damaging lies are the ones I tell myself.

The fact is my ‘double life’ was just the end result of the fact that I was not willing to truly take responsibility for my choices and do what was right for me.

Serge Benhayon and Universal Medicine have supported me to live responsibly and true to myself and begin living in a way where I can truly connect with myself and others.

Leonne Sharkey (After Universal Medicine) Leonne Sharkey (After Universal Medicine)

A beautiful woman with nothing to hide… Me (Leonne Sharkey) aged 33-34, after Universal Medicine

​​I no longer feel like I have something to hide. I am proud of each and every loving choice I make and if I make choices that are not loving I am willing to be honest about this and find out why.

I have so much more understanding for myself and in turn I have become less judgmental about the choices others make or have made. The more I return to who I truly am, the more I am able to appreciate others for who they truly are.

The truth I have come back to is – I am love. I am enough just as I am and I am a son of God. This truth applies to us all. The more I allow myself to accept this truth, the more amazing life gets. Each day I live this truth is a new before and after.

Leonne Sharkey (After Universal Medicine)
Leonne Sharkey – Age 34 (After Universal Medicine)


I am eternally grateful to Serge Benhayon and Universal Medicine for presenting and confirming the truth I have always known.

By Leonne Sharkey, Melbourne

Related Reading:
The Before & After Photo Diary of Universal Medicine Students
Before and After My Self Love Program – Forever Unfolding the Real Me
Universal Medicine Before and After Photos – the Man beneath the Tattoos and Dreads

617 thoughts on “Before & After Universal Medicine: From Living a Lie to Living Who I Truly Am

  1. Understanding how complicated a lie is, that a lie can be presenting a false way to live, for me is very well explained by you in this blog. Its beautiful to hear you discover the woman that was waiting patiently to bloom, it makes me understand my kids more that go between two homes.

  2. Overriding or dismissing what we feel or intuitively know is like lying to ourself but if we don’t necessarily see it that way because we’re so used to doing it and have normalised and justified living like that. But we can start to develop more honesty with ourself – being open to truly listening to what our whole body is saying and starting to put that into action instead of the thoughts that go against it.

  3. I would have never equated ignoring my body’s message as ‘living a lie’, but it so is. Lying is fiddly. It breeds incongruence and needs constant patchwork. It so makes sense how exhausting that is.

  4. I think we all know that feeling when we are not being true to ourselves, whether we change ourselves completely or measure ourselves just a bit to fit in. You hit the nail on the head with responsibility, do we take responsibility for putting out to the world who we truly are and making choices that constantly confirm and build that – or do we put out a version of us that’s not true and advocate that it’s ok to live this a measured life and make choices harm us and others.

  5. ‘Each day I live this truth is a new before and after.’ This is what is so lovely about living a life of love, truth and responsibility – life constantly expands and evolves when our choices truly support us.

  6. Lying is an interesting one. It is not necessarily something we do to others although this is a possibility. It is not necessarily about something we did wrong and want to hide. It could also be about something good that happened to us. It could also be something that never happened that we wish it had happened. None of these scenarios is better than another one. Lies never can provide a foundation to really move forward in life.

  7. ‘I now know that the most damaging lies are the ones I tell myself.’ So true Leonne, exposing any lies we live in life can feel very empowering and allows us to uncover more false ways we are living that are not serving us or anyone else. To bring this level of responsibility and truth to our lives allows us to build a more solid foundation of love that allows us to blossom and evolve.

  8. Leonne, you expose the biggest lie, the belief that lying is something done to others. Whereas you show powerfully that what causes most harm is lying to ourselves.

  9. As children we are often not supported to build a loving relationship with ourselves and our bodies, everything centres on how we are with other people. Patterns designed to please others at the expense of ourselves are cultivated early. Choosing to live responsibly and honestly supports us to live again fully appreciating who we are and what we bring to the world.

  10. “My refusal to put the basket down showed that I had already learned to act the way I believed others needed me to in order to be accepted and ‘do the right thing’.” How quickly we learn to behave in a way that does not support us, we would rather endure pain than admit that what we are doing is not loving or caring towards ourselves. It is amazing how early on in life we learn to conform to what we think will be seen as being accepted as the right thing to do.

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