But are they Really ‘Skeptics’?

Have I ever met a true skeptic?

I’ve known a few ‘skeptics’ in my day. The one I know best is myself, IF my definition of a skeptic is used (not expecting anyone else to share my definition, however). It tallies more with the ancient definition that did not include shutdown or attacking behaviour against others, as we are seeing abundantly in the so-called ‘skeptics’ of today.

My definition is: someone who is on a committed search for Truth, requiring solid proof of it (not restricted to reductionist science or intellectual argument) instead of blind belief, someone who will question the validity of appearances until reaching something essential that feels true and holds true, and ‘stands the test of time’.

Crucial in my definition of a true skeptic is genuine openness, that is, being open to all the possibilities and not excluding or ‘being blind’ to any because of a position of bias, fear, judgment, discomfort, comfort, vested interest, or any other agenda.

It is an openness that will allow the opportunity of actually feeling the Truth when it is right there, going: ‘Look at me!’ It is an openness to admit having held an off-track view or bias, and made mistakes based on it: in short, an uncompromising honesty with self and others. It is an openness also to accept that there is no perfection in this life, and that using lack of perfection as a justification for skepticism about something is a neat trick, but very dishonest.

With this openness must come the understanding that we look dispassionately at our own ‘beliefs’ again and again as new things come up that we should not ignore. It might mean our view has to be modified, or totally and uncomfortably thrown out, if it’s shown to be no longer correct or serving the bigger picture.

By my definition, I have met very, very few true skeptics in my life, even among the scientists. I aspire to be a seeker of Truth, and would happily throw out the word ‘skepticism’ as now being too loaded, contaminated and abused to be of any further use to humanity.

My ‘brownie points’ are I suppose, that throughout my life I’ve let go of a multitude of deeply held ‘pet beliefs’ when Truth came a ’knockin! Does that leave me empty? No way – fuller than ever! And yet, acknowledging imperfection and the gradual process of personal and group evolution, I’m sure I have many more beliefs yet to root out and discard…

From the Past… into the Future

There is a schism going on in science: on the one hand, modern physics is increasingly realising the utter connectedness and oneness of all, that everything is energy, that consciousness is a fundamental property of the universe, physical matter is illusory (although rather real to us), and that everything happens because of energy and consciousness.

On the other hand, the ‘old guard’, particularly in biology, is sticking to the view that all consciousness is merely a product of the mechanical behaviour of physical matter, i.e. in our brains.

A network of consequences of this materialist, reductionist, so-called scientific, so-called skeptical view of reality is that there is no divinity, no purpose, no big picture, no God, no higher love or mind, no ultimate good, no life beyond death, no real connection between people: we are all terrible islands of matter in a random universe of separated things.

There’s no point in being ethical, honest, religious, true and loving, all are a waste of time and energy. Why not just indulge, explore, play games, be ‘bad’, be ‘good’, do what you want? Nothing matters anyway. What dreadful emptiness this view gives rise to!

No matter how much the holder of such a view tries to fill that emptiness with relationships, work, wealth, pleasure, pain, peace, fighting, possessions and achievements of the mind and body, the self-created, un-fillable void is there niggling away in the background, influencing every choice, every moment of life.

This view also limits the ability of science to expand to its true capacity, as some modern scientists are coming to realise and express.

So here are some observations on a few of the beloved ersatz skeptics I have known personally – not of course devoid of my imperfect attempt to keep my judgement and biases out of it! But you’ll feel the picture. The reason I share this is to make very personal and relatable some of the strategies we humans use to avoid the truth, and hide under an apparently respectable cloak of ‘being skeptical’. Perhaps it will resonate with some and bring in a fresh wind of awareness.

Skeptic #1

Skeptic #1 subscribes to the above materialist, reductionist school of thought.

Skeptic #1’s way of denying and covering over and trying to fill the unfillable empty void that sprouted from lovelessness in childhood, that cannot be filled with relationships, work, pleasure, possessions and even outstanding achievements, is with drugs: mind-altering substances, any number, any amounts, any combination as required to not feel the emptiness.

But here’s the rub – how do you trust the thoughts and opinions of a mind that is constantly altered and swayed this way and that by recreational drugs? Although they may provide apparent epiphanies of perception, how ‘true’ are those perceptions? I speak from my own experience too, not of filling emptiness with drugs – I was a wake-up to that one at least – but testing them to see if there were any ‘valid answers’. Actually, no, there were not, and I quit completely.

Skeptic #1 rejected my expressions that consciousness is beyond physical brains, that separation is an illusion, that love is real and higher than emotions, and that life is full of meaning and connection.

Skeptic #1 often tried to win me back to drugs. It felt to me like an attempt to rationalise behaviour that was felt and known to be harmful by getting another to enjoin it. I would not, and this friendship fell away. I had begun to feel distrust and frustration with what felt to me like blindness, arrogance, inconsistency and harm associated with drug taking. I’m personally privy to the deep, old hurts that Skeptic #1 experienced as a child, and how they’ve continued to play out, unhealed and unaddressed, in adult life.

What Skeptic #1 is doing these days I don’t know, however perhaps the love and light dawned and true clarity was chosen instead of drugs. I feel to never give up on anyone – the seeds of healing lie dormant within all of us, and miracles do happen!

Skeptic #2

Skeptic #2 maintained an interesting, oscillating relationship with truth. Once again, I’m privy to the depth of personal childhood hurts and how these hurts have continued to run the self-beliefs, choices, attitudes, relationships and opinions of Skeptic #2.

Skeptic #2 dipped in and out of education and employment, a ‘course junkie’ for a while, but not following through with anything. This has had a big impact on the foundation of Skeptic #2’s living.

The course, job, project or activity would go along well for a while, providing much enjoyment and support. But then the ‘skepticism’ would rise to an intolerable level such that Skeptic #2 would turn around and denigrate that which had been providing satisfaction, and slide into dissatisfaction, self-criticism, depression, and rejection of the world and everyone in it; into a desolate cynicism that picked apart everything and found it wanting.

Every expert detail provided to meet acceptance was rejected… always more requirements, always more criticisms, always rejection, never satisfied. It kept looking like self-sabotage to me, but always blaming… blamed on another, and/or blamed on self.

An obvious question would be ‘why’? If there is genuine joy in anything in life to be found, why smash it and move away? Why the blaming and self-blame? It feels like an intentionally created vicious spiral. It feels like excuses – to not face or accept responsibility for one’s involvement in and commitment to life.

Skeptic #3

Skeptic #3 shared with me that they were deeply hurt by a parent’s consistent coldness and withholding of love.

Skeptic #3 expressed an enduring resentment and bitterness (and even disgust) for not having been loved as a child by the parent from whom that love was sought. To me it felt that what Skeptic #3 was most afraid of was admitting that the lack of love has been continued from within – they were not taking responsibility for loving and caring for themselves.

I feel it is for each human to connect to their own inner love, be it and express it, regardless of anyone else’s choice to be loving or not. At some point, we have to heal ourselves. Difficult as it may have been in childhood, continuing to blame someone else for not providing love is not true to who we are, nor is it a path to healing. We humans do not sit well with being untrue to the love that is our real essence, but we get entrenched in our habitual ways.

So in adulthood, when Skeptic #3 was dealing with a series of health problems which modern medicine was unable to help, those old habits were an obstacle to using some nourishing complementary therapies that were safe and effective. Skepticism reared its head, in the form of rejecting (from a position of ignorance) that there could be any value in complementary therapies, and not even wanting to find out.

Why would one not want to find out? Could it be there was denial and protection going on? How ironic that someone whose very profession and passion (science) was founded upon the ‘objective’ search for truth, should choose to suffer and be self-limited by the fear of truth! It was easier to go on suffering health problems (as a victim) than to look at the root cause of the suffering, and take responsibility for the years of choices that built it to the level that was now constantly being experienced.

Is it possible that to look at root causes would bring up guilt for being dishonest with themselves – in their choice to be angry, bitter, resentful and not self-loving over the years?

It amazed me that a scientist refused to look at the biology of nourishing the body. It made no sense. Then I realised that by doing so, Skeptic #3 would risk blowing the cover of victim-ness. Then the truth of the lack of taking responsibility for self-loving and self-nurturing would be revealed, the blaming of others for one’s own choices would also be revealed, and all would have to be faced, admitted, and addressed.

Going Deeper

This blog is not about slamming my beloved ersatz skeptics and all the hundreds of others whom I know and love or may not know yet. It is about understanding human behaviour arising from hurts, the persistent feeling of emptiness that comes from those hurts and how they govern our way of expressing.

Who hasn’t been hurt? Who hasn’t acted at some time or another in a way they knew was not true to themselves? All hands up!! Readers may have begun to realise that practically every one of us has pockets of the same kinds of ‘skeptic’ behaviours as we’ve talked about here: protective behaviours based on hurts and beliefs about ourselves in our own lives, to varying degrees.

In other words, there is something (or many somethings) that we don’t want to look at, that we shy away from the truth of, because it would highlight our hurts, beliefs and our lack of taking responsibility in some areas of life.

If you dig below the surface of the behaviours that come from our hurts and beliefs, you’ll find that at heart all humans are loving and responsible. To be otherwise is a v-e-r-y uncomfortable admission of not being true to ourselves and to humanity!

So we hide and bury our untrue-ness and lack of responsibility, pretend to ourselves that there’s no issue to look at within, and use skepticism as a protective cover to prevent the truth from being revealed. It seems easier to suffer and cause suffering for a whole lifetime than to ‘fess up’ and do what must be done.

Ironically, the very taking of responsibility and doing what must be done is the exact cure for the ills brought about by the continued hiding behind ‘skepticism’, which isn’t really skepticism at all!

In truth, there is no emptiness or nothingness in the universe, including within us, so something must fill the void left when an ’empty’ person hides behind ‘skepticism’.

But what fills it? Could it be something else, something untrue that just makes things look the way we want them to, but ultimately leaves us feeling just as ’empty’? It’s a vicious spiral – and the tragic irony is that we really do know this all along and choose to keep covering it up.

Many self-avowed ‘skeptics’ (in fear, denial and protection) are very vocal in specifying exactly what conditions do and do not meet their criteria for truth. But as soon as you meet their ‘criteria’, they will find some other conditions to require – conditions that get more and more detailed, ridiculous and irrelevant as they go along.

Eventually, their conditions end up including things, people, activities or organisations that are not even the target of their criticism, quite the opposite, thus deepening the contradictions. In short, they can never be satisfied, because protection is the name of their game, and it’s such a powerful controller of them that they can’t even stop to accept the ludicrous self-contradictions that they communicate.

So, instead of choosing an ‘us and them’ way, could it be time to recognise the shades and grades of skepticism within us all as an indicator of how humanity is not living true to itself?

By ‘us and them’, I mean we comfortably run with – ‘good us, bad skeptics’ or ‘good skeptics, bad whomever-they-are-attacking’ (depending on which side of the fence you’re on). Whereas, if this little essay has revealed anything, it’s that there’s no ‘us and them’ for we are all the same inside and all equally responsible for our hurts and their effects upon our collective human life.

A harming skeptic who becomes abusive, e.g. by cyber-bullying or denigrating others in any way, must not go unchecked of course. Being ‘hurt’ is no excuse. In those cases they should be severely sanctioned and prevented from doing further harm.

However they are the extreme cases (though growing in number exponentially) of a humanity-wide continuum and we would do well to look at their actions in the context of a much bigger picture. As members of society it behooves us to step up and take responsibility for calling out every instance of untruth within ourselves as well as that which is going on around us, no matter how apparently uncomfortable or ‘trivial’ it may seem to be.

By Dianne Trussell

Further Reading:
Religion, Philosophy and Science = Revelation
Giving Power back to Love: Making the Choice to not be Dominated by Hurt
Serge Benhayon brings philosophy to life

479 thoughts on “But are they Really ‘Skeptics’?

  1. It is so true that most skeptics are not true skeptics, i.e. someone unbiased in their questioning, but instead people questioning and doubting because of pre-judgments as a result of previous personal painful experiences. When we do this we hinder understanding and evolvement because we are stuck in the past rather than expanding and moving forward. Therefore we carry a great responsibility when we claim being skeptical – are we being truly being so or are we hindering development out personal fear of experiencing something painful?

  2. On re-reading this what strikes me is something I have become aware of through attending the presentations at Universal Medicine – that is I can often react to things I hear – and at that moment I don’t want to know the truth – I want to stay in the comfort of not knowing because if I admit it is the truth I have to look at my own irresponsibility or my own life choices and realise I haven’t been living a true life. Which then means that all along I actually know the truth – I’m just choosing not to accept it. So even if I am skeptical deep down I already know the truth – as if I didn’t I wouldnt be skeptical in the first place – as that to me is simply another form of reaction (and a reaction that delays us taking responsibility for what is true).

    1. Totally agree Jane, maintaining a level of irresponsibility is totally comfortable it allows me to maintain a status quo to not rock the boat too much and truth cuts through this like a hot spade through snow! I have heard only truth at the Universal Medicine presentations offering me the option of a hot spade!

    2. Yes Jane 🙂 we do know and I have felt that exact same thing that you describe that in the moment there’s a not wanting to know because then ‘responsibility’ has to be addressed. It’s a funny thing that when I hear something out loud, like at the Universal Medicine presentations as you say, it’s like I can’t pretend anymore that I didn’t know – what a funny game we play thinking that if it’s not said out loud then we can get away with it so to speak.

      1. Great point Shelly, what gets revealed is something we already knew, quite often it was an uncomfortable nagging sensation that was quite constant and consistent, but until it is spoken out allowed by someone else we play the game of pretend… absolutely crazy.

  3. “… using lack of perfection as a justification for skepticism about something is a neat trick, but very dishonest.” Thank you for pointing this out, it is true it is so easy to use imperfection as a justification that something can’t be right, but in the end it is only an excuse to not take responsibility.

    1. Because attachment to ‘perfection’ is the always just out of reach carrot… the smoke screen that keeps us from living the fact that we are all that we need to be already. The cruelty and impact of maintaining this gap is hard to fathom.

  4. We humans do not sit well with being untrue to the love that is our real essence, but we get entrenched in our habitual ways.” Our human dilemma explained in one sentence.

  5. Thank you Dianne, I like your definition of a skeptic and that we are all in one way or another so called skeptics but that a true skeptic does not hide behind their hurts but is committed in their search of truth and is genuinely open to all the possibilities.

    1. I had always viewed a sceptic as quite a negative person, yet from your new refreshed, or maybe old and wise, definition, scepticism is something we could be inspired by.

  6. I love how you redefined what a skeptic is Dianne. We live in a world where re-definition of ‘what is’ is over-killed to defame truth and hide what is there. Universal Medicine presents the truth energetically. It goes to the energy of things to capture the true essence and meaning. It is a great school that is empowering how to discern what is truth energetically because energy cannot be bastardised no matter what is imposed on top of it.

    1. I agree Rik, and there is so much more to life than we choose to see or feel, yet deep down we all know there is more to life, and we all feel things around us. That we feel everything and that everything is energy is equal for us all, yet it is the least talked about, or openly agreed thing in life – it is always present, yet we don’t talk about it.

    2. Absolutely Rik, everything is energy, and Universal Medicine presents this. Universal Medicine is a ‘great school that is empowering how to discern what is truth energetically because energy cannot be bastardised no matter what is imposed on top of it.’

  7. An interesting look at the subject of skepticism Dianne. The skeptics you describe do not look like the skeptics I have seen as such, but the feeling I got reading your essay was the qualities that so many of us carry in varying degrees. I also felt the broader purpose of what you are expressing here: that we can latch onto beliefs, ideals and behaviours to confirm our ignorance and use this as a way of avoiding any real relationship with truth and the Divine bigger picture. Hence I see why you have discussed the importance of responsibility at length because in effect, we bury our hurts and form layers of protection to sustain our ignorance, pushing away the very thing that will bring the liberation our heart yearns for.

  8. “In truth, there is no emptiness or nothingness in the universe, including within us, so something must fill the void left when an ’empty’ person hides behind ‘skepticism’.”

    This is super interesting and fascinating to ponder. If we don’t choose the fullness of our own love, we leave the door wide open to be filled by a deceptive energy that may give us what we think we want for a time (or it may not), but always sustaining the illusory importance of perpetual motion, keeping us asleep to the truth we could otherwise be living.

  9. “My definition (of a skeptic) is: someone who is on a committed search for Truth, requiring solid proof of it (not restricted to reductionist science or intellectual argument) instead of blind belief, someone who will question the validity of appearances until reaching something essential that feels true and holds true, and ‘stands the test of time’. Crucial in my definition of a true skeptic is genuine openness, that is, being open to all the possibilities…”

    I resonate with this definition Dianne. I have always been a truth seeker, albeit with my meanderings and protection to cover my hurts. But always I have needed to explore and live a concept rather than accept a commonly held view or the appearance of something. I have always needed to dig deeper and brought an openness to the Truth. I have immense gratitude for Serge Benhayon for living his light and love in full so that his mastery of living has enabled the illusion we live to gradually be revealed, so that we have the choice to liberate ourselves from our hurts and live a truly loving life.

  10. This is fact Dianne, that does not need to be proven because I know it .. “the self-created, un-fillable void is there niggling away in the background, influencing every choice, every moment of life”.
    Any investment or protective mechanism that you need or rely on to keep you going in life requires you to fulfil it. This can be a partner, a career, a hobby or food, anything that fills the void. We are masters of fulfilling our needs and not being responsible to the fact our purpose is to evolve out of the voids not feed them.

  11. Simply beautiful, Dianne.

    When you say, ‘Who hasn’t been hurt? Who hasn’t acted at some time or another in a way they knew was not true to themselves?’ – this is a huge reality check. To accept that this is true means one also accepts that we human beings are more alike than we are different. And if that is also true, and we can accept that, then maybe it can be time to stop protecting and defending our hurts. In protection we are only hiding from ourselves and not really fooling anyone. A good reminder for myself!

  12. I used to shy away from the truth: as soon as I got anywhere near close I would dive left or right in an absolute abdication of responsibility and rejection of the glory, wisdom, love and divinity at hand. That was my individuated human-ness acting out when all the while I knew that my only place and purpose was alongside everyone else, surrendering to a unifying and responsible plan. Today I can still feel my slippery-ness when the call of life offers me another opportunity to expand, but through practise and building steadiness I more readily stay at the coal face for the days work ahead alongside all of humanity.

    1. So true Brendan. There is great wisdom in not assuming that our current reality is all there is but accepting that we are forever students of life ongoingly learning from the lessons that life offers us.

  13. Thank you Dianne a great article with so much truth in it that we all search for and know is their somewhere but are often happy to stay in the comfort of not knowing or else searching for something we already in truth know , that is why we are searching for it. Life provides us with the opportunity to learn and discover for ourselves if we are prepared to heal and listen to our bodies and this journey of return is there for all of us to take by our consistent choices and loving ways.

  14. Indeed who hasn’t been hurt. Reading your blog Dianne gives us a greater understanding of human behaviour when we are hurt; having this understanding supports us in our healing and in making loving choices.
    A very interesting blog to read Dianne with so much to ponder.

  15. Thank you Dianne for a great blog, showing all the dishonest ways we humans go to, to protect and not feel our hurts, the only way out is to take responsibility for our choices thereby allowing our hurts to be healed.

  16. This is great to read, as it shows the ways of the skeptics that are not true to the true sense of the word. I can feel how it is all based on the protection of the hurts we all got, and thus lots of us have a part skeptic in us that is protecting our own believes we have taken on. It is great to feel this, and see that that is there, and knowing the love that is within makes it possible to untangle this barrier and see that there is much more to life than we know it. Being able to be a true skeptic testing life out.

  17. Re reading your blog Dianne I realise as you say we are all skeptics to a greater or lesser degree. It appears to be our lack of wanting to take responsibility for the way we live, and often don’t look after ourselves in the manner we deserve. We look outside of ourselves for reasons to not do so and blame others for their lack of love for us.

  18. If we don’t deal with our hurts it is amazing how much it clouds us from feeling the truth. I have known some harmful skeptics that have such unresolved deep hurts within they easily abuse many innocent people around them. Eventually they will feel the impact of their choices and that living this way is harming themselves and others.

  19. “As members of society it behooves us to step up and take responsibility for calling out every instance of untruth within ourselves as well as that which is going on around us, no matter how apparently uncomfortable or ‘trivial’ it may seem to be.” I couldn’t agree more and it can be uncomfortable and it may seem trivial to some but the more I commit to myself living from my innermost the more I cannot tolerate behaviours that are not from love. Expressing how I feel is incredibly important to me now and this way of being I am developing every day.

  20. “I feel to never give up on anyone – the seeds of healing lie dormant within all of us, and miracles do happen!” When I first read this sentence I glanced over it feeling the resistance. I know it’s true but sometimes at those challenging times I have moments of giving up on another. It makes me realise of the investment I have in another to get it instead of accepting them for where they are at and each moment for what it is.

  21. Beautifully explained with much wisdom Dianne . You have exposed skepticism with in me in varying degrees. It has helped me understand the layers of protection from our hurts or not living responsibly with energetic integrity.

  22. This is a great blog Dianne, I love the way you approach this subject, and yes bringing understanding to our hurts is essential, ‘It is about understanding human behaviour arising from hurts, the persistent feeling of emptiness that comes from those hurts and how they govern our way of expressing.’

  23. As always Dianne Trussell is illuminating the world… Taking such a thorny stance as the sceptics soapbox, and delicately lovingly dissembling it so that no sceptic worth their reliance upon the intellect could still stand and, with their sardonically amused intolerance cast their web of undermining intellect out to the world, is worthy of a standing ovation… Thank you again.

  24. Dianne, what a read, and an uncomfortable one at that. What I got to feel and understand is that we can all fall back into skeptical behaviours when we do not want to feel our hurts and take responsibility for the choices we’ve made and that in some (often many) cases we would rather hold onto those hurts and play the victim rather than feel and understand our responsibility in dealing with them and getting on with life. This highlights the need for honesty as a starting point to at the very least be willing to be open to the fact that we do not want to address something rather than hiding in the intellectualism and arrogance of skepticism; skepticism feels like a compounding and a burying of our hurts and it achieves little as we do eventually have to look at and address them. For now you’ve inspired me to begin to get truly honest about those places where I still play victim and demand that things be a certain way before I surrender, and writing this I’ve just realised that this is skepticism.

  25. For me its the skeptic that remains open that is the most vital – there is a saying that the I think was made famous by the Dalai Lama about observing a teacher and how they live for a period of 5 to 10 years, and only then giving yourself fully to their teachings. This is a healthy amount of skepticism… because you are remaining open to the possibility, rather than being shut off to the potential that lives in all of us.

  26. As is so well said here ‘… at heart all humans are loving and responsible…’ For us to be irresponsible and put our hurts first is us just not wanting to feel our potential – as simple as that. We have really mastered the game of playing small and not living our potential – the thing is, until I decided to become a student of Universal Medicine, I could have sworn that there was no other way to be or live. That is how far the game sucks us in and this needs to be exposed.

  27. Thank you Dianne for helping us develop a deeper understanding of our behaviour, hurts, and the reactions that follow.
    “It is about understanding human behaviour arising from hurts, the persistent feeling of emptiness that comes from those hurts and how they govern our way of expressing.”
    Thank you also for once again sharing your experiences, wisdom, and knowledge.

  28. At some stage in our life we have all expressed some form of skepticism and as a result closed ourselves off from the power of being open to there being a depth of understanding we have not connected to and denied ourselves access to the truth within it. A great lesson in remaining open to what we yet don’t understand for the truth to unfold.

  29. Calling out every instance of untruth within ourselves and around us takes a total commitment to responsibility. It’s our resistance to seeing our untruthful ways play out in our bodies, lives, and world around us that feels quite uncomfortable. Bringing love and understanding to ourselves – that we have been irresponsible because we’ve been hurt and have been acting out of protection, and we’re all the same in this – gives us the space to be honest, start addressing the hurts and let them go.

  30. Understanding how hurts affect our behaviour is a key step in our true evolution and development of intelligence that serves everyone.

  31. How very interesting while the skeptics appear to challenge theories and/or findings in order to get to the truth of the matter, I can feel a stopper at the different level of layers that gets activated when we know there actually is a deeper truth that we’ve so invested in not looking at and that is about to get triggered and we know ‘we’ need to change if we are to fully embrace that.

  32. Dianne – I resonate with what you say here; ‘…an uncompromising honesty with self and others…’ – What an opportunity we have to start being honest! Something that I can put my hands up and say I have not been in the past. Even to the point of saying ‘I’ll take the washing upstairs’ and then the next time I go upstairs I don’t take it – I am lying to myself. Or when I let jealousy or comparison in, even the tiniest amount – I am in effect not being honest with my own self worth.

  33. I have always viewed sceptics as those who have a chip on their shoulder or have an axe to grind, but now having felt the wisdom you shared in your article Dianne, I realise the difference between the bastardised meaning of the word, which I bought into, and the true meaning of the word.

  34. How true Dianne and thank you for writing this as I had not ever considered the question what is a true skeptic. Once you have put it out there of course a true skeptic must be open to the truth, but we have a world full of skeptics who are not open to the truth, but who rather are cemented into a position that nothing will shift. Perhaps it has always been thus, but even so it would make sense to have a different word such as scoffer for a skeptic whose position is based on beliefs rather than truth.

  35. Being sceptical in life is actual being knowingly in denial of where you belong to and in that holding on to your ideals and beliefs that have been further entrenched by you holding on to the hurts you have because of this way of living. When you are in full acceptance and appreciation of who you truly are and in the knowing that you are part of that grander whole and actually do not belong to this world of creation, you would be unconditionally open for any truth that would be offered to you.

  36. “someone who will question the validity of appearances until reaching something essential that feels true and holds true” When I first, second and third read the book ‘The Way It Is’ by Serge Benhayon I watched as so many of my ideals and beliefs were exposed as I had the realisation that I was reading something essential that felt true and holds true and continues to deepen my appreciation of the truth and the discarding of ideals and beliefs.

  37. Great point Dianne about learning to be aware of the skeptic within. This is sneaky and often has us in its grasp before we have clocked it. It is this septic that can cause us the most harm.

  38. Your blog Dianne is very informative, knowledgable and wise. I really appreciate your explanation of what your blog is really about. Of course our challenge and responsibility is to not be governed by our hurts, but to understand and let go of what harms us; certainly a work in progress;
    “It is about understanding human behaviour arising from hurts, the persistent feeling of emptiness that comes from those hurts and how they govern our way of expressing.”

  39. “I’ve let go of a multitude of deeply held ‘pet beliefs’ when Truth came a ’knockin! Does that leave me empty? No way – fuller than ever!” This is freedom. To be stuck in held beliefs makes me feel trapped, I was trying to work out why and I realised it is because we are constantly evolving, therefore what we think we know, we may not actually know once we look at it from a difference angle, or a different body. I would have thought there was nothing wrong with my sugar addiction from my sugar-addicted body, but take the sugar out of me, get over the detox period and I immediately feel the superficial buzz. My body has changed and therefore my sensitivity has changed, therefore my belief on what was harming and not harming changed….and not a book or a scientist in sight!!!

  40. A brilliant and powerful blog Dianne exposing the different types of skeptics and their behaviours they use to justify and defend their position. I notice when I am around skeptics how super important it is to be open and loving and to not feel crushed in anyway by their choices to live in such a reduced and loveless way.

  41. Dianne, you go big on this one and it’s definitely a post and topic I’d like to revisit. I’d never considered what you wrote about skepticism, nor had I known the definition. It strikes me that the bastardised version of the term comes from a place of individualism, where people feel they must protect (or fight for) what they believe to shield themselves from their past hurts. We work so hard not to be open, natural and loving, and I’m guilty of this as well. You’ve given me great food for thought, thank you.

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