The Cycles of Nature – Returning to My Clairsentience

Due to family circumstances, I have had some tough times learning to find my place in the world. However, I have always felt safe in the world of nature, outside, with animals. 

One of my earliest memories is at age six or seven sitting in a meadow in the sunshine, surrounded by Welsh mountains, observing a brown and white cow chewing her cud, feeling very much part of a living, changing scene (though nothing much was happening) as if I, a little child, was somehow essential to the beauty of it; as if my being there provided a focus and a reason – was important, an energy essential to the scene. When I think of that moment, I feel happy and free, secure that I was (am) very much in the world and of it. I feel whole. I see it and experience it like it was yesterday, in vibrant colour, feeling the warmth of the air around me.

It is said that when we are children we remember the sensory qualities of the things we care about. Our senses resonate together – so much so that, in effect, they are a single, marvellous instrument. In fact, our five senses are coordinated under the impulse of our 6th sense of sensing and feeling energy: the sense of clairsentience. I count it still as one of my rare moments of deep settlement for that time of my life. Just being there. I wanted to understand why nature, other beings and my environment had such an impact on me, and to this day, seem to be essential to my wellbeing. I have always loved all animals and plants, everything that grows. My life’s journey has been about this search for meaning: my place in the world and how to relate to my fellow human beings.

In 2011, after much study, trying out various Churches, Buddhism, and alternative therapies, I was encouraged to read a book , “The Way It Is” by Serge Benhayon, and some of my experiences gathered on my journey started to make sense and to fit together. I attended some of Serge’s presentations. I became more aware of my inner self – my essence – and how I had become separated from it, instead learning to take my cues for living from the outer world, separated from my inner feelings. But I was cautious. Nothing I had tried previously had helped me re-discover the sense of being in and of the world, essential to it, being held and part of the whole.

In 2014, I was introduced to gardening when I met a lovely lady who asked me to come and help her on her large allotment. It was fun working together, and we soon got some produce going – there was a fantastic poly tunnel and a lovely pond (if we could but see it for the plants that made their home there!).

As I worked, I noticed how the insects were drawn to the ‘other’ plants on the allotment, the weeds: nettles, dandelions and the wild flowers, as well as to our herbs and cabbages and carrots, runner beans – they didn’t discriminate! I gradually recognised how the ‘whole’ was working together. One late night we sat by the pond watching the sun go down, and the moon and stars come out. It was a beautiful experience, and even then, the insects were busy. Have you noticed, bees don’t have any ‘time off ’? They just keep going until they die, serving their world, the hive and us in so many different ways that we are only now becoming aware of, now that we are losing them and the abundance they bring us all. 

There was something else, too. Our observations made us aware that there were other things at work, more than we can see with our eyes, something bigger. Just as we can’t see our seedlings developing under ground, we still know it is happening. We feel it, like we feel the sap rising to the pull of the moon and the planets as they move across the constellations of the stars. We live in their cycles.

I realised through Serge Benhayon’s teachings of the Ageless Wisdom, and my attention to my inner world, that I was re-discovering stillness – the quality of experience I had out in nature when I was a child. Through observing the wildlife and feeling how to work sensitively with the plants and accepting the whole of what we had to work with, including imperfections (what are commonly know as weeds), my awareness and sensitivity were increasing.

In the garden, we decided then to foster the harmony of the ‘whole’, to never use any chemicals that might kill some of the beneficial insects and plants that make the whole patchwork in its unique and exquisite way. Not discriminating, we kept some wild areas and we learnt to love our nettles and brambles because we noticed that the butterflies liked to lay their eggs on the leaves, and how the bees loved the flowers. In early spring, the bright yellow flowers of the dandelion provide the only food for the bees. We grew some wild flowers and herbs. Our awareness fostered a responsibility for caring, to be true and honest about the way we worked in this space, honouring all its parts and understanding our purpose there. We worked with love in our hearts, feeling our connection with ‘the all’. Feeling into what was needed and when, to the best of our ability.

Whenever I worked in the garden, I had a feeling of spaciousness under a big, open sky, as I tended the brown crumbly earth and its inhabitants. I became more aware of the lengthening of the days in March when spring was arriving, and their shortening in September/October when autumn started showing its true colours: the velvety brown-black leaves as they are due to fall, the astonishingly bright yellows and oranges, and various shades of green that have already captured and carpeted the ground. As the hedges, once neatly trimmed, began their growing season in March/April, we were advised not to cut them again until September when the birds had finished nesting and most had flown. March was the time when our water supply to each allotment was turned back on for us to use, because now there was little likelihood of the pipes freezing.

And so these practicalities, these movements, fine-tuned our senses as we relished and appreciated the subtle changes each day presented to us, and we responded to what was needed to be in harmony with the garden’s being-ness and its needs. Year after year, this cycle reassuringly repeated. I found I could look at a plant and know what it needed: whether it be feed, water or to be moved to a different spot. My clairsentience was developing. I felt the pull of the moon and stars on the young plants I had set and on the seedlings underground and I felt joy in my body.

I noticed more things about the sky now, and how I often felt tired and needing to rest more the week before the moon’s appearance in its fullness. I was appreciating the wonder of the space above us and how the constellations impulse the seasonal cycles, and how much better I felt if I followed the impulse to rest when needed and to move when needed, too.

As I re-discovered more truths about life and living through studying the Ageless Wisdom, I came to understand and appreciate deeply the Magic of God. That God speaks to us in the small details we could easily miss as we go about our daily lives, such as the whisper of the leaves as a warm breeze catches them just as I am walking by, that the beauty of nature is there to reflect to us how we can live in a way that is loving and healing for ourselves and for the other human beings on this planet, our brothers and sisters.

There is nothing new to learn, we already are everything we need to be. We have been distracted and we have lost touch with our purpose, and nature helps us by confirming what we already know. We all are evolving back to who we truly are in our magnificence, where we can truly enjoy the ‘beingness’ of all our six senses guiding our movements and can choose to listen to the cycles in which we are embedded and which nurture our body and our Be-ing.

So much of my childhood memory is back living within me today, and as such is deeply appreciated and cherished.

By Christina Mehew, Nottingham

Further Reading:
The Magic of God in Nature
Nature: The Ultimate Reflection
All of nature is here to support us to return to who we truly are

65 thoughts on “The Cycles of Nature – Returning to My Clairsentience

  1. It’s easy to feel the level of harmony you feel in nature in this piece about working in the allotment but with this also the relationship you have with the grandness which impulses all of nature to be.

  2. The more we connect with heaven and thus develop a Truly religious relationship with God, the deeper our understanding of what is on offer from every aspect of the universe.

  3. The word ‘returning’ is such a powerful one because it underlines the fact that we have already been clairsentient before. In fact more than that we have already been everything before, there is nothing outside of us to reach for but there is everything inside of us to return to.

    1. Your comment Alexis feels deeply settling that we are already everything and it’s all there waiting for us to return to the magnificence of who we truly are.

  4. Gorgeous sharing Christina. So much of our life as adults we are encouraged to segment and compartmentalise when we naturally feel the energy of everything, just like that. Like the weather you don’t need to know it’s raining to feel the wet drops fall on you and so energy of our families, workplaces and social events are ever present too whether we choose to accept the truth or not.

  5. Reading this blog is like listening a symphony of life and at the same time the almost unnoticed melody that lovingly reminds us about our nature and origins

  6. I can so relate to connecting to the cycles of the seasons, moon, plants, animals and within ourselves from the beauty of gardening and living in the UK. I lived 14 years in the UK and much of it in North Yorkshire where we grew nearly all our own food and the seasons slightest shift was intricately known and felt and there was such a beauty in this, like the cycle of our breath expanding out and settling back within into the stillness of space, so too the UK seasons share an exquisite rhythm that we are equally part of. I came to mark and celebrate each winter and summer solstice, each spring and autumn equinox, and the points in between – each offering an angle to pause and take stock. So too the moons; full, waxing, half, new etc, each felt in my woman’s cycle and in the world around. Life is cycles, yet we have made time linear, separate, points in the past we leave behind and points ahead to strive towards, omitting the present and its gift, that we are living in cycles and in cycles the quality we live right now counts. Lovely piece Christine, thank you very much. Enjoy the garden, and you in it.

    1. Thank you, Kate, being in nature and becoming so familiar with the cycles and feeling their subtle effects on our bodies is such a confirmation and an enrichment to daily life.

      1. ‘Enrichment’ is such a beautiful word and even more beautiful when it’s lived. True enrichment comes from allowing Life to take the lead and never from what most of us are currently attempting to do which is to pull life in the direction that we erroneously think it should be going.

    1. and everything that is in front of us offers a reflection help us on our way. Such is the detail and depth of God’s love for us. We just have to recognise the value of what is being presented to us in the moment.

      1. And move in relationship with the constellation that is offered for us to evolve, and thus offer the reflection required in that moment for our evolution.

  7. We are part of the cycles of life and yet we attempt to hold ourselves out of the pull of cycles and career off on a tangent believing that we are at the helm and can decide where and when we go. But in truth there are only two choices as to which direction we go, 1) adhere to and be absorbed back into the nature cycles of life and allow life to guide us 2) resist the ever present pull of cycles and live in constant but often undetected tension as a result.

    1. I agree Alexis, option 1 is about the ‘bigger picture’, and acknowledging that there is more to us than just being human in a physical body, whereas option 2 is about getting by, absorbing the unseen tension and coping with the anxiety of it while we make a life in un-awareness, doing the best we can in those circumstances.

      1. Christina thank you for expanding on Alexis ‘s comment to see the ‘bigger picture’. I was supported to see the ‘bigger picture’ recently and for me it was like taking my eye away from the Microscope, looking up and seeing that there is far more to see than what going on right in front of me. When I make it all about me I have lost the connection we all have to the universality of life.

  8. Observation is powerful – it brings understanding and wisdom. Observation of each other is healing and reduces the judgement, comparison, jealousy and competition we can otherwise go into.

  9. Recently I was walking through a beech wood and I stopped to feel what was around me, the birds singing and the profound stillness, that stillness that you can feel when it’s snowing is electrifying. And the myriad of the colours of green as the sunlight broke through the trees. It’s like being held in someone’s reassuring arms so that you can just let go and relax.

    1. UK woodland is so delicately alive and still, it is exquisite, thank you for sharing that moment, the quality of light through the fresh bright leaves, spring bird song – and you pausing and held – totally gorgeous.

  10. “One of my earliest memories is at age six or seven sitting in a meadow in the sunshine”, there are certain words that I can feel deep within my heart, ‘meadow’ is one of them, ‘orchard’ is another.

  11. I read this sentence today Christina
    “I noticed more things about the sky now, and how I often felt tired and needing to rest more the week before the moon’s appearance in its fullness.”
    I have really noticed the lead up to this full moon my whole body is responding, it’s incredible and shows me that if we allow our bodies to communicate they speak to the stars. If we dull them as I did then I could feel nothing. Now through my body I have this connection to the stars and the universe and it is as natural as breathing.

  12. Beautifully written Christina with the same essence as the flow of nature itself. It shows us that what some of us take for granted is really pure joy in the bigger picture of life. I feel the delicacy that is you, in this writing.

  13. Reading your words Christina has brought a settlement to my body – re-connecting with nature through your words has offered me a moment where I can walk through nature with you and appreciate the true simplicity of everything that has been bestowed on us by God. In your words I can feel the sensitivity and delicacy of a woman in harmony with the world around her. In a world so consumed by man made objects it feels healing to feel the glory and wisdom of the Universe around us in every moment.

  14. There are some huge positives coming from this Covid-19 lock down and to me one of them is that people have not got such easy access to all the chemicals they put down at this time of year to kill the slugs and snails without considering that these are very big part of the food chain for Thrushes and Blackbirds. Is it possible that the Thrushes have declined over the years because they eat the snails that have ingested the poison and they themselves are poisoned too?
    We think we are so intelligent but we are very far from our true intelligence because we do not know how to live in harmony with ourselves, all others and the world we live in.

    1. Yes, Mary, there were a few people still using chemicals on their allotments, but it is heartening to see this practice dying out as people are tending now to use natures own remedies to bring balance and sustainability to the land, and to ensure their food is safe to eat. Our allotment community are very much into helping wildlife and growing organic food.

  15. When I was a child we were always outdoors, even in winter we spent as much time outdoors as possible. Nature has a way of reconnecting us back to the oneness we come from. It’s a constant reminder of the beauty and stillness of space.

  16. I love the way you observed the insects arond the ‘weeds’ and thus learnt that everything has its place – and that judgment, any ideals of how things should be to conform with our version of right and wrong and ideologies are the true weeds.

  17. “That God speaks to us in the small details we could easily miss as we go about our daily lives, such as the whisper of the leaves as a warm breeze catches them just as I am walking by” Christina your description stirred up a deep memory in my body the first time I read it and now for a second time too. Magical stuff.

  18. “It is said that when we are children we remember the sensory qualities of the things we care about”, I would say that as kids we remember the sensory qualities of pretty much everything because we live in a sensory world all of the time. As kids we smell, taste, touch, listen and ‘look’ our way through life, we live in a sensory world. As adults we live in a cerebral world, we isolate ourselves in the dusty attic of the head, rather than living from the vibrant warmth of our bodies.

  19. Christina I have just read the second paragraph again and through your absolutely brilliant conveyance of what you felt in your body as a child I too could feel life on a deeper level. I’m not sure that I can put what I feel into words as well as you have but perhaps simply to say that you have managed to convey what for most would be an almost wordless experience into words. So incredibly beautiful. Deep thanks.

    1. I’m feeling it again as I read your words, Alexis. It is a joy and a wonder that we can circulate this depth of experience, which is love, and share it again and again with everyone. Thank you..

  20. “We all are evolving back to who we truly are in our magnificence, where we can truly enjoy the ‘beingness’ of all our six senses guiding our movements and can choose to listen to the cycles in which we are embedded and which nurture our body and our Be-ing”, Christina I love your use of the word ’embedded’ because it’s exactly what we are. ‘Us’ and Life are one and the same and our downfall comes from the fact that we see ourselves as separate to Life. We think we’re individuals living separate lives from one another, we think that we ‘love this’ or ‘hate that’ but that’s all part of the illusion, the truth is we’re not separate at all, we’re an integral part of The All.

    1. I love the word ’embedded’ too, so warm and cosy, like being in the womb, and it is how I feel when I am putting a little seedling in the ground, tenderly holding it by one of its tiny leaves so I don’t injure it, and then snuggling it down into its little bed in the soil that I have made for it, delicately forming the soil around it so it can be supported grow. Delicious!

      1. Christina through your description of how you plant seedlings I can feel how it is love that transforms the world. If we were to live the level of delicacy and loving care in our every day that you use to plant seedlings, then we would all be back in the sea of love that is our natural Home, rather than the roaming around in No Man’s Land that we’re all currently doing.

  21. Christina I just want to say that you have such a beautiful way of writing. This was utterly enchanting to read, truly magical in your description, you brought the detail of nature alive. Gorgeous, gorgeous, gorgeous.

  22. Have you ever watched a slow motion film of how the flowers turn to always face the sun? You can only observe this if filmed in slow motion but it tells us so much about how connected the plants are to the cycles of the sun in ways that we have forgotten, or have just taken for granted in our ignorance and arrogance. Yet if the sun was to suddenly stop shining the world would be plunged into darkness and we would all freeze to death in a short space of time. Have we ever stopped to consider the possibility that there is a far greater intelligence that is taking great care of us and provides our Planet with a mass of fire which we go round and round in cycles until we remember who we truly are and start the journey back to God once again. He is the provider of our source of light which constantly reminds us that we come from light and we will return to light.

    1. Hello, Mary, I felt deeply held as I was reading your comment. Thank you for making this point. So much in life that we take for granted is holding us. I felt my own arrogance, as I read your words. Who am I to take such a gift as the Sun so lightly, when it is actually part of us, because without it we would die very soon? Who am I?
      If we try to imagine what it would be like to lose some of the everyday things we take for granted it feels quite shocking,
      To be without the sun.
      And then, I am growing in awareness of if the Sun is part of us, and we are part of it, how magnificent are we really? I feel expansion, and deep appreciation for your expression.

  23. I really enjoyed reading your article Christine, about how nature supports your awareness, clairsentience and sensitivity. It seems that when we appreciate the activity and cycles of nature, we become in harmony with a much grander order.

    1. We see ourselves as separate from the natural cycles of life. We allocate the cycles of life as being something that affects birds, animals, plants, the moon etc. but most of us don’t consider ourselves to be part of any of that. We see ourselves as free thinking separate intelligent human beings who are capable of so much more than living in cycles. We pride ourselves in our ability to forge the kind of life that we want and to live in whatever way we choose, but it’s this way of thinking and living that’s causing us such inner and outer turmoil because we’re constantly pulling against the natural order of life, an order that we are an intrinsic part of.

  24. I love reading this as it brought life in the garden and nature alive. Yes I see the beauty of nature all around but this introduced all the tiny details like where the butterflies like to lay their eggs which reflects how equally important every tiny living thing is on this planet and there is absolute purpose in everything to make the whole work, thrive and evolve. I especially love the reflection of the bee never having ‘time off’.
    I could see this written as a children’s book with beautiful delicate illustrations!
    Thank you a beautiful delight to read.

    1. Thank you, Julie, what a great idea for the Children’s book! I like your descriptive words: beautiful, delicate, delight! Delight is one of the words I feel when outdoors. Definitely, and the balance of nature we are finding on a larger scale, is delicate too. Lovely comment.

  25. Reading this blog it felt as though I were walking through the cycle of the seasons with you, feeling the flow of life and the deep nurturing we can bring.

      1. Reading the words ‘the flow of life’ triggered a memory deep within my body of feeling the flow of life in my body as a child, I can feel it again now, not that I can describe something so deeply beautiful but I can feel how it weaves it’s way through the deepest part of me and it brought up the image of me playing by a stream, which is something that I did a lot of as a child.

Leave a Comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s